Scope Instructions

Mueller Variable Power Rifle Scope Instructions

Thank you for choosing a Mueller scope. It is a precision instrument constructed of the finest materials and assembled by highly skilled craftsmen for a lifetime of trouble-free use under the most demanding conditions.

This booklet will help you achieve optimum performance by explaining how to use it’s various features and how to care for it. Read the instructions carefully before mounting and using your scope.

How To Use Your Scope

Eyepiece Focusing

Hold the scope about three or four inches from your eye and look through the eyepiece at a featureless, flatly lit bright area such as a wall or open sky. If the reticle is not sharply defined instantly, loosen the eyebell lock-ring. Turn the eyepiece (either direction) a few turns. Quickly glance through the scope again. If the focus has improved, but is still not perfect, continue focusing. If the focus condition became worse, turn it the opposite way. When the reticle appears in sharp focus, retighten the lock-ring.

On models equipped with a fast focus eyebell, one only needs to turn the eyebell in or out for adjustment. There is no lock ring with which to be concerned.

WARNING: NEVER LOOK AT THE SUN WITH THIS PRODUCT OR EVEN THE NAKED EYE. IT MAY PERMANENTLY DAMAGE YOUR EYES.

Mounting

To achieve the best accuracy from your rifle, the scope must be mounted properly. Use a high-quality mount with bases designed to fit your particular rifle. The scope should be mounted as low as possible without touching either the barrel or the receiver. Before tightening the mounting rings, look through the scope in your normal shooting position. Adjust the scope (either forward or backward) until you find the furthest point forward (to ensure maximum eye relief) that allows you to see a full field of view. Rotate the scope in the rings until the reticle pattern is perpendicular to the bore and the elevation adjustment is on top. Then tighten the mounting screws evenly.

WARNING: AVOID OVER-TIGHTENING THE RINGS. THIS CAN DAMAGE THE SCOPE, AFFECTING PERFORMANCE OR RENDERING IT INOPERABLE. THERE SHOULD BE A SLIGHT EVEN GAP BETWEEN THE RINGS. BE SURE THAT THE SCOPE IS MOUNTED FAR ENOUGH FORWARD. IT’S REARWARD MOTION MAY INJURE THE SHOOTER WHEN THE RIFLE RECOILS. YOUR SCOPE IS NOT COVERED BY THE WARRANTY IF DAMAGE RESULTS FROM IMPROPER INSTALATION.

Pre-Zeroing

Pre-zero sighting can be done either manually or with a bore sighting collimator. To bore sight manually, open the action of the firearm. If your scope has an adjustable objective, rotate the parallax ring to the 50 yards position. Set variable-power scopes to mid power. With the firearm in a steady rest position, remove the caps from the windage and elevation screws. Adjust the windage and elevation screws to position the reticle on the center of the target. If a large amount of adjustment is required to align the reticle, make approximately one-half of the required windage correction, then approximately one-half of the required elevation correction. Finish by applying the balance of windage and elevation correction.

NOTE: When using windage-adjustable rings, make major windage correction with them. Final adjustment should be made with the scope’s internal adjustment system.

Zeroing

Final sighting-in of your rifle should be done with live ammunition, based on your expected shooting distance.

DANGER: If a bore sighting collimator or any other bore obstructing device was used, it must be removed before proceeding. An obstruction can cause serious damage to the gun and possible personal injury to yourself and others nearby.

If most of your shots will be at short range, zero-in at 100 yards. But, for long-range shooting at big game, most experienced shooters zero-in a few inches high at 100 yards. Set parallax correctable models to the 100 yard position. Set variable-power scopes to highest power. Form a steady rest position, fire three rounds at a target 100 yards away. Observe point of impact on the target and adjust windage and elevation screws as needed to correct aim. Repeat as necessary.

NOTE: Each click of adjustment changes bullet strike at a shooting distance of 100 yards by the amount indicated on the windage and elevation screw dial plates.

WARNING: ALL SHOOTING SHOULD BE DONE AT AN APPROVED RANGE OR OTHER SAFE AREA. EYE AND EAR PROTECTION IS RECOMMENDED.

Scopes with Illuminated Reticles

If your scope has an illuminated reticle, there are degrees of illumination. The rheostat is located at the top of the eyebell. The battery is a coin style lithium batteries. When replacing the used battery, first remove the battery compartment cap on top of the rheostat adjustment turret, then insert a new one “+” side up in the battery housing. When needed, replace battery with a CR2032 or equivalent.

Parallax Correction

To be parallax free, the target must be located at the distance for which the scope is focused. Targets at any other distance will cause parallax, which manifests itself as apparent movement of the reticle against the stationary target. Riflescopes equipped with a focusable objective lens allow for parallax correction at various user-select ranges. To adjust the range setting of the scope, rotate the objective focus ring to the desired distance setting.

NOTE: The location of the parallax adjustment may vary between models. The adjustment may be located on the objective, in front of the eyebell or in the saddle area of the scope.

Maintaining Your Riflescope

Your scope, though amazingly tough, is a precision instrument that deserves reasonable cautious care. Do not attempt to disassemble or clean the scope internally. The external optical surfaces should occasionally be wiped clean with the lens cloth provided, a optical quality lens paper or lens cleaning pen. Keep the protective lens covers in place when the scope is not in use. Remove any external dirt or sand with a damp cloth, following with a dry cloth. Then go over the metal portions of the scope with a silicone treated cloth in order to protect the scope against corrosion.

Store the scope in a moisture-free environment. Avoid storing the scope in hot places, such as the passenger compartments of vehicles on hot days. The high temperatures could adversely affect the lubricants and sealants. Never leave the scope where direct sunlight can enter either the objective or the eyepiece lens. Damage may result from the concentration (burning glass effect) of the sun’s rays.

WARNING: UNNECESSARY RUBBING OR USE OF A COARSE CLOTH MAY CAUSE PERMANENT DAMAGE TO LENS COATINGS. DAMAGE RESULTING FROM IMPROPER CARE WILL NOT BE COVERED BY OUR WARRANTY.